Lee Kuan Yew (1923-2015)

Many things have been written and said about the great man, Lee Kuan Yew, who was Singapore’s founding Prime Minister. He died on March 23 at the age of 91. I have much respect for him — who was the head of the government that transformed this-once a colonial trading post into a modern metropolis which is also a beautiful & safe place to live in.

Remembering Lee Kuan Yew
Remembering Lee Kuan Yew (1923-2015)

 

Here are some notable quotes from him; some hard truths, some witty and some with no doubt stirred much controversies but all classics:

 

For me, it is a moment of anguish. All my life, my whole adult life, I believed in merger and unity of the two territories. (August 9, 1965)

 

Whoever governs Singapore must have that iron in him. Or give it up. This is not a game of cards! This is your life and mine! I’ve spent a whole lifetime building this and as long as I’m in charge, nobody is going to knock it down. (Rally, 1980)

 

Mah Bow Tan, age 16, took his ‘O’ levels – six distinctions, two credits. Mr Chiam, age 18 – 1953 I think – six credits, one pass. He passed his English language, not bad. The next year, in 1954, he worked harder, he got a credit for his English. So you see, it’s not because he doesn’t know English that he found difficult in expressing himself. It’s what’s inside here *tapping his head*. And you better search your inside here before you cast your votes. Goodbye and good luck. (Speech at Fullerton Square dissing Chiam See tong, 19 December 1984)

 

I am often accused of interfering in the private lives of citizens. Yes, if I did not, had I not done that, we wouldn’t be here today. And I say without the slightest remorse, that we wouldn’t be here, we would not have made economic progress, if we had not intervened on very personal matters – who your neighbour is, how you live, the noise you make, how you spit, or what language you use. We decide what is right. Never mind what the people think. (Straits Times, 20 April 1987)

 

You know, the cure for all this talk is really a good dose of incompetent government. You get that alternative and you’ll never put Singapore together again: Humpty Dumpty cannot be put together again… my asset values will disappear, my apartments will be worth a fraction of what they were, my ministers’ jobs will be in peril, their security will be at risk and their women will become maids in other people’s countries, foreign workers. I cannot have that! (Straits Times, 5 April 2007)

 

If Aljunied decides to go that way, well Aljunied has five years to live and repent. (April 30, 2011)

 

I have spent my life, so much of it, building up this country. There’s nothing more that I need to do. At the end of the day, what have I got? A successful Singapore. What have I given up? My life. (2011)

 

Source: Wikiquotes

Henderson Waves

Opened in May 2008, the Henderson Waves Bridge connects  Mount Faber Park and Telok Blangah Hill Park. This 274-metre long pedestrian bridge runs across Henderson Road  at 36 meter above the road. It is also the highest pedestrian bridge in Singapore (2014).

It looks impressive, doesn’t it?

 

Looks like a snake, but I like the call it a dragon -- oriental one :-)
Looks like a snake, but I like to call it a dragon — the oriental one 🙂

 

The south-western view from the bridge includes the luxury waterfront residential complex, i.e. Reflections at Keppel Bay which was designed by architect Daniel Libeskind. After taking that shot, I looked behind and found even more residential apartments and the Central Business District at the distance. Nice views!

 

The Reflections
The Reflections at Keppel Bay
View of residential areas of Telok Blangah, Bukit Merah, and the Chinatown. The CBD is in the background.
View of residential areas of Bukit Merah, Tiong Bahru and Chinatown. The CBD is in the background.

 
How to get there:

 

The View from East

This week, we “hiked” east-ward to Kampong Kayu. Like Farrer Park is to Farrer Road, Kampong Kayu is not found anywhere near Jalan Kayu but within the walking distance of the Mountbatten MRT Station (Circle Line).

The residents here appear multi-cultural, and I witnessed them living rather harmoniously and enjoying each others’ company. When I was setting up my tripod, one of them came out to strike a conversation with us. He showed us the photos he took using his Galaxy smart phone – impressive panoramic shot of the view during sunset.

The view is indeed impressive. City skyline in the background with lush greenery and one calm river. I just don’t like the ugly floodlights peeping out of the Marina Bay Golf Course. Just across the river is the new National Stadium due to complete in June 2014. That is less than a month from now. But the roof doesn’t seem to be done yet, so good luck to meeting the due date!!!

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Sunset over the upcoming National Stadium
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Singapore city skyline with Geylang River in the foreground.
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Construction still ongoing at night to complete the National Stadium in time due in June 2014!!!
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Cat on his throne

Nifty Fifty

I love prime lens, and the 50mm focal length is one of my favourites. In my opinion, primes generally offer 3 main advantages — (a)  less optical distortion introduced, (b) have wider maximum aperture for those bokehliciuos portraits and finally (c) for the smaller package as compared to zoom lens.

50mm focal length (in full frame) is nifty because you can use it for many types of photography genres. If you’re new, 50mm should be your first prime because it can help you explore these various genres. You’ll be able to find what you like — portraits, street, landscape, etc before investing further in other lenses.

If you’re using a camera with APS-C sensor, you should be looking for focal length of about 35mm. Olympics and Panasonic mirrorless cameras use m4/3 format and the equivalent focal length is 24mm.

All photos  below are taken with the manual Minolta MD 50mm f/1.7 with full frame sensor.

Kid at the playground under mom's watchful eyes
Kid at the playground under mom’s watchful eyes
Children at the playground
Children at the playground
Lego car down the slide
Lego car down the slide
Man looking for a seat at McDonalds, King Albert Park
Man looking for a seat at McDonalds, King Albert Park
Gathering at McDonalds, King Albert Park
Gathering at McDonalds, King Albert Park
Status update?
Status update?
McDonalds at King Albert Park on its last night of operation.
McDonalds at King Albert Park on its last night of operation.
Group selfie
Group selfie
Barista at the CAD cafe
Barista at the CAD cafe
Relax lah.
Relax lah.
Not plain but fruity water
Not plain but fruity water
Cookies
Cookies
Barista at the CAD cafe
Barista at the CAD cafe
Blue hour at the junction of Alexander Rd & Queensway
Blue hour at the junction of Alexander Rd & Queensway

Wide-angle Saturday

More photos this weekend using the Nikkor-N 24mm f/2.8 lens.

The rain after a bout of dry season created a perfect environment for many of the trees here to  blossom. I would suggest that the National Parks Board of Singapore dedicate an area in the Gardens by the Bay planted with rows of these Tabebuia Rosea or the Trumpet Trees. This will create our very own version of Sakura Spring/Cherry Blossoms!

Saw these blossoming trees on the way to NUS Utown.

Singapore's version of Cherry Blossoms
Singapore’s version of Cherry Blossoms
Singapore's version of Cherry Blossoms
Singapore’s version of Cherry Blossoms

Then again, I do not think these trees are local. They could have been brought over from the Central/South America region about 50 years ago during the greening campaign.

Education Resource Center & Ngee Ann Kongsi Auditorium at NUS UTown
Education Resource Center & Ngee Ann Kongsi Auditorium at NUS UTown
Graduate Residence at NUS UTown
Graduate Residence at NUS UTown
Graduate Residence at NUS UTown
Graduate Residence at NUS UTown

Blue Hour at the Port

Woke up early for this shot. This was taken from one of the south-facing blocks in the Engineering Faculty of the National University Singapore (NUS).

This is the Pasir Panjang Terminal, part of Port of Singapore.

The Port of Singapore includes terminals located at Tanjong Pagar, Keppel, Brani, Pasir Panjang, Sembawang and Jurong. They can accommodate all types of vessels, including container ships, bulk carries, ro-ro ships, cargo freighters, coasters and lighters. The Pasir Panjang Terminal (PPT) handles mega container vessels of 13,000 TEUs or more with quay cranes that can reach across 22 rows of containers. Remote controlled bridge cranes allow each operator to handle up to six cranes. [Source: Maritime and Port Authority of Singapore]

Blue Hour - Port of Singapore
Blue Hour – Port of Singapore